Plant-Based Market Overview

Beyond Meat (BYND), a food company that manufactures, markets, and sells plant-based meat products in the US and internationally, went public last week and tripled its issue price of $25 on its first day. Despite being unprofitable, BYND continues to attract investors with its speed and scale of distribution (already in ~15,000 grocery stores and ~12,000 restaurants), rapid revenue growth (170% YoY) and demonstrated economies of scale (20% gross margin).
Beyond Meat S-1 Document

Consumer appetite for plant-based products has been on the rise and there are no signs of it slowing down. Already, approximately 120 million Americans identify as either vegan, vegetarian or flexitarian, and 60% of Millennials have already at some point consumed plant-based meats. The impact of this phenomenon has been most notable in the dairy category, where growing popularity for milk alternatives like oat milk and other nut-based milks has resulted in a significant decline in dairy sales and has even forced some dairy farmers to begin plant-based milk production (92-yr old dairy plant pivots).

I’ve been excited about plant-based products for some time now, and have tried everything from meats to cheese to milk and even seafood! I’ve synthesized my insights on this growing market and compiled some of the most interesting companies producing plant-based products for consumers below.

As consumers increasingly demand healthy alternatives, and ingredient technology advances, plant-based proteins will displace traditional ingredients to create a new generation of products. 
Success of new products with consumers will rely on: Taste, Texture, Comparable Appearance, Price, Brand and Distribution

Problem Solving for the People by the People

Following an unprecedented election that left Americans divided and displaced, the media in battle over facts with the Trump administration, and the security of every individual uncertain and threatened, we are now witnessing an explosion of organizations and startups focused on uniting people and leveraging the power of collaboration to collect data and build technology to secure our freedom and future.

Fears of government defunding data collection, manipulating data sets and mis-communicating politically inconvenient research have inspired the founding of organizations like Data Refuge, a distributed, grassroots effort around the United States in which scientists, researchers, hackers, students, librarians and other volunteers are collecting government data to preserve it and keep it publicly accessible. Their focus on climate and environmental data is in defense of the White House removing climate data from the EPA website and screening scientific research. Others, like Open Context are helping preserve, annotate and share archeology data.

Find out what other government data is being removed from the Internet at Sunlight Foundation, where they are actively tracking the removal or changes to data sets.

Collaborative research platforms will emerge in every industry to not only aggregate and maintain integrity of data sets but also enable individuals to accelerate the development of solutions independent of government funding and policies.

This is Wikipedia on steroids and much more. Data.world is a social network exclusively for people who want to find and collaborate on building data sets. Similarly, ResearchGate provides a professional network for the scientific community to connect, collaborate, share results and drive progress. Already, more than 11 million scientists and researchers use it and are uploading more than 2.5 million publications each month.

Beyond the civic tech and education categories, this same model of empowering individuals to organize and work together to problem solve has also been successful in transportation with Waze, financial investing with Numerai, app development with GitHub, data science with Dataiku, startup solutions with ProductHunt, and many more.

Success of these platforms have initially been driven by users who are mission-driven, motivated by gamification/monetary rewards, or seeking to build an online portfolio. These platforms crossed over the chasm from passing curiosity to active and productive engagement, enabling them to truly provide more value with each user and establish a sustainable data network to help them accelerate solutions. And as these platforms grow, they will become future leaders in their industries and many will redefine our workforce.

 

Telehealth and the Future of Healthcare

As Washington continues to war over “Repeal and Replace” of the Affordable Care Act, one thing is certain: the need for affordable and accessible healthcare that is patient-centered and personalized. Millions of women, senior citizens, employees and independent business professionals will be affected by the expected changes to Obamacare, including, but not limited to, reduced health benefits and preventative services, discontinued subsidies, and rollback of Medicaid.

Waiting for sweeping government changes is not the solution, and development of innovative health solutions have already been underway. There’s no question that the future of healthcare is digital, where individuals are equipped to self diagnose, doctor communication is remote and timely, medication is on-demand, and data is empowering prevention, drug discovery and development. Concern and curiosity motivated me to explore our current healthcare progress and available solutions.

Remote care delivery will evolve to become the first point of contact for everything healthcare

 

There have been a number of telehealth startups that have entered the space in the last ten years, spanning doctor discovery and scheduling, remote care delivery, prescription management, patient monitoring and education, and more. However, remote care delivery proves to be a unique entry point with strong network effects that will enable it to quickly scale and evolve to offer services and products across the healthcare space.

Copyright© 2014 Motivation Science Inc.
Copyright© 2014 Motivation Science Inc.

While the barriers to entry are low, new entrants’ will face a difficult and costly uphill battle as they attempt to bring on high quality providers onto their platforms, and compete to secure employers and health plan contracts in advance of leaders like Teladoc, MDLive, American Well and Doctor on Demand, who are already expending significant costs to capture market share of these customers. A robust salesforce and brand awareness are key to penetration, but also not effective without offering ease of product implementation & interoperability, billing & claim filing, and regulatory compliance (HIPAA, NCQA). The strategy to secure employers and health plan contracts is an attempt to capture mass membership quickly and establish high switching costs as many self-insured employers (ASO) and insurers may only adopt one telehealth platform; according to a 2016 analysis released by the Congressional Budget Office, ~155 million Americans have employer-based health insurance coverage.

However, there is room for certain specialist-focused telehealth startups, such as Spruce, who is primarily focused on the dermatology market, which remains untapped by incumbents and accounts for >5% of annual visits, or 56 million visits. This type of specialist visit is recurring and typically costs higher (up to 3x – 4x the cost of a primary care visit).

The existing focus among players remains client growth, but the future indicator of market dominance will be member conversion and [recurring] utilization to drive PMPM, visit fees and secure client relationships. Achieving these future indicators will rely on management, business models, consumer-centered & mobile-optimized products, and seamless integration of concentric mergers.

Why now? – Political

This future of healthcare has been accelerated because of easing regulation on telemedicine definition, reimbursements and coverage. Already in 32 states and the District of Columbia there are parity laws that require private insurers to cover telemedicine visits the same way they cover in-person encounters, and in 49 states and District of Columbia reimbursements are now provided for video visits in Medicaid fee-for-service programs.

Additionally, more states have removed the requirement for a tele-presenter to be present during a virtual consultation. Finally, 18 states have enacted laws to join the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, which will begin to grant crossborder licenses.

Why now? – Social

Easing regulation complements today’s consumer needs. Consumers no longer want to pay high costs for healthcare and are looking for more personalized care at a time when many of the other decisions they make on a daily basis have been empowered with technology and made more affordable, accessible and personalized (i.e. food, wealth management, online streaming, transportation, travel, shopping). Early direct-to-consumer fitness trackers and health apps invited consumers to increasingly value and invest in their health, and track their own progress and symptoms.

Telehealth will continue to gain traction especially at a time when Repeal and Replace Obamacare risks exacerbating lack of access and rising costs. Approximately 1/3 of all ambulatory care visits, or 417M, are treatable via telehealth, which would result in an annual saving of $6 billion in U.S. healthcare costs. Cost saving opportunities via telehealth are also true for other specialist services.

Big 4 Telehealth

The four largest telehealth players are Teladoc (NYSE: TDOC), MDLive, American Well, and Doctor on Demand. Despite Teadoc’s current leading market position with ~17M members, it still represents only a minority of the whole market.

Teladoc Investor Presentation

Of these four, Doctor on Demand (DoD) is unique as it does not charge a “Per Member, Per Month” (PMPM) subscription fee, which typically costs $1 PMPM. Unlike the other three, DoD only charges visit fees, which they keep ~25%:

Medical Doctor:
$49 for a 15 min consultation

Psychology:
$79 for a 25 min consultation
$119 for a 50 min consultation

Lactation Consultant:
$99 for a 25 min consultation
$229 for a 45 min consultation

As telehealth platforms compete for employers, DoD offers an affordable option without the PMPM fee. While DoD’s model lacks the initial recurring revenue from PMPM fees, it is able to more easily align with the cost savings and ROI incentives of employers, drawing evidence that utilization rates are below 5% with other major players; Compared to Teladoc’s 5%< utilization rate, DoD boasts a much higher utilization rate of 25%-30%.

In other words, the cost per visit with Teladoc is significantly higher than $49 when factoring in PMPM. This strategy has had promising evidence as DoD now has about 400 employers (200% increase YoY) including Comcast and Union Bank & Trust, covers more than 45 million Americans and has secured relationships with UnitedHealth, Highmark*, Humana, and a number of Blue Cross Blue Shields.

*Highmark ended $1.5M contract last year with Teladoc to switch over to DoD and American Well. Most Teladoc contracts are only 1-year old…

Adoption goes both ways.

Slack, Dropbox, LinkedIn and many others have demonstrated that adoption goes both ways. And similarly, monetizing the B2B becomes much easier to achieve if you’re able to demonstrate success with B2C. DoD has since introduced a Per Provider Subscription Fee…(I don’t have numbers around this).

This is a defining time for healthcare – the winners have yet to take all and new entrants will need to be thoughtful about their unique entry point and resourceful with acquisition.

Show Me the Money

Created by Tiffany Stone
Created by Tiffany Stone

Alternative lending involves various types of loans available to consumers and business owners outside of a traditional bank loan.  Alternative lending includes crowdfunding (rewards and equity-based), peer-to-peer lending (interest-based, asset-based, consumer, small business) and other non-bank financial firms.

I’ve shared below my comparison of a few major online alternative lenders, including Lending Club, Prosper, Earnest, LendUp, Sofi, Upstart, OnDeck, Kabbage, Borro and Wonga.

Alternative Lending Comparison Slide 1 - Tiffany Stone Alternative Lending Comparison Slide 2 - Tiffany Stone Alternative Lending Comparison Slide 3 - Tiffany Stone Alternative Lending Comparison Slide 4 - Tiffany Stone Alternative Lending Comparison Slide 5 - Tiffany Stone Alternative Lending Comparison Slide 6 - Tiffany Stone

DevOps Market Map

I’ve put together a basic DevOps Market Map.  Check it out, would love suggestions/feedback!

What is DevOps?

Development + Operations

DevOps is a software development method that aims to increase communication, collaboration and integration between software developers and IT operations through automation of the change, configuration and release processes, an extension of Agile Development – releasing updates to product early and often (“perpetual beta”).

* DevOps requires not only the appropriate tools but also a change in organization and culture.

DevOps Lifecycle:

  1. Check in code
  2. Pull code changes for build
  3. Run tests (Continuous Integration server to generate builds & arrange releases): Unit tests, integration test, user acceptance test
  4. Store artifacts and build repository (repository for storing artifacts, results & releases)
  5. Deploy and release (release automation product to deploy apps)
  6. Configure environment
  7. Update databases
  8. Update apps
  9. Push to users – who receive tested app updates frequently and without interruption
  10. Application & Network Performance Monitoring (preventive safeguard)
  11. Do it Again!
DevOps Market Map by Tiffany Stone
DevOps Market Map by Tiffany Stone